How can I find articles in the Hamilton Spectator or in Canadian newspapers using LexisNexis?

Go to LexisNexis

  • start at the Library home page 
  • click on the Articles/Databases tab
  • type "lexisnexis academic" into the search box beside "Database Name" 
  • on the resulting page, click the "LexisNexis Academic" link

To find articles in the Hamilton Spectator:

  • click the "Find" option next to Source Directory (top right) 
  • in the "Keyword" search box, type "hamilton spectator" and click "Find Sources"
  • on the results page, under "Select sources below to search", tick the box beside "The Hamilton Spectator" and click "OK - Continue"
  • Note: coverage for the Hamilton Spectator in LexisNexis is from October 07, 1991 through current

To find articles in Canadian newspapers:

  • click the "Browse" option next to Source Directory (top of page)  
    • for #1, pick "Publication Type"
    • for #2, "Filter by: Country"; from the dropdown choose "Canada
    • for #3, click "News" and choose "Newspapers"
  • put a tick mark beside any or all newspapers that you want to search and click "OK - Continue"

Constructing a search

  • on the search screen, type the words or phrases you want to find:
    • each search box (whether it be on the main page, or on any of the search forms in the Search By Content Type menu) defaults to a Natural Language search; type a question, a sentence, or a few descriptive terms in the search form to initiate this type of search; for example: water pollution 

    • if Boolean connectors (e.g., AND, OR, AND NOT, etc.) are used to combine words and phrases in a search box, then a Boolean Search will be performed; also, if a search is refined using any of the Advanced Options options (e.g., by date, a segment/field, etc.), then the search will be run as Boolean; for example: pollution AND (water OR ocean OR lake)

  • use the wildcard symbols ! and * to catch word variations: 
    •  the exclamation point ! replaces more than one letter at the end of a search term; for example: bank! will find banks, banking, bankrupt, bankruptcy, etc.
    • the asterisk * replaces one letter and can be used more than once in a word; it can be used anywhere EXCEPT as the first letter of a word; for example: organi*ation will find organization, organisation
       
  • use quotation marks for an exact phrase, for example: "master chef"

Limiting a search

  • use the Advanced Options
  • specify a date or date range if desired
  • select a segment (e.g. headline, geographic region, etc.) to search within a section, if desired
  • on the results screen:
    • sorting by "Relevance" should bring the most relevant articles to the top
    • "Search within results" (top right) can be used to narrow your results to include more words
    • "Result Groups" (on the left) can narrow your results by subject, geography, language, etc.