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Chartist collection

The items are listed in chronological order.

1 Address and rules of the Working Men's Association, for benefitting politically, socially, and morally, the useful classes.London: Cleave, Watson, Hetherington, [1836?]. 8 pp. Disbound. Apparently the first edition of the prospectus and rules relating to the formation of the first and most important Chartist organization, the result of whose agitation was the People's Charter of 1838. The Association was formed in 1836. Goldsmiths' 29815 gives the date as 1837 with a question mark. The address is signed in print by Henry Hetherington and William Lovett. Not found in Kress Catalogue

2 [Lovett, William et al.] An address from the Working Men's Association, to the working classes, on the subject of national education. London: Cleave, Watson, Hetherington, [1836?]. 8 pp. Disbound. 12 mo. Signed in print by William Lovett, Secretary, Henry Hetherington, and twelve others. Goldsmiths' 30666 enters it under 1838, with a question mark. The present copy bears an early pencilled annotation: "The original plan published on Nov. 15, 1836." First edition (?). Not in Kress Catalogue.

3 "Working Men's Association...Sir, From your known devotion to the cause of representative government..." 1 page printed leaflet, May, 1838, requesting participation in an effort to organize a "great demonstration of the people of London in favour of Universal Suffrage."

4 The people's charter; being the outline of an act to provide for the just representation of the people of Great Britain in the Commons... prepared by a committee of twelve persons, six members of Parliament and six members of the London Working Men's Association... London: published for the Working Men's Association, by H. Hetherington, [1838]. 36 pp. including illustrated frontis. Disbound. The first edition of this seminal document, inscribed on the front blank "G. Dent from his friend J. Jaffray, Bookbinder." Jaffray was one of the committee of twelve which sponsored the manifesto; in fact his name appears first on the printed list of signatories. The Charter was "drafted by Francis Place from materials supplied by William Lovett" --Palgrave. "What gave the Charter unique importance and influence was the fact that by it the political aspirations of the masses of the people were focused as never before." --E.S.S. Kress C4706, under Francis Place. Goldsmiths' 30717.

5 "Working Men's Association...Sir, We respectfully request you to present the enclosed copy of the 'People's Charter' to the members of your society..." 1 page printed square leaflet, 18 x 18 cm signed in print by Lovett. An important occasion, marking the first distribution of the Charter to interested organizations and soliciting constructive criticism. Dated May 20, 1838. A deadline was set for June 25th, at which time a revised version of the Charter would be prepared "in compliance with the wishes of the majority."

6 The people's charter; being the outline of an act to provide for the just representation of the people of Great Britain and Ireland... prepared by a committee of twelve persons, six members of Parliament and six members of the London Working Men's Association ...Third edition, revised and corrected... London: Published for the Working Men's Association by H. Hetherington, [1838]. 36 pp., illustration on verso of title page. Disbound. "Drafted by Francis Place from materials supplied by William Lovett." --Palgrave. Kress lists the first edition under Place. It does not list this edition which contains numerous alterations. This edition not in Goldsmiths. A reference to this edition in another dated pamphlet establishes clearly the date of publication as September, 1838.

7 The Question "What is a Chartist?" answered. [Caption title]. (Finsbury Tract Committee, Mason, rptr. c.1838-1840.) 4 pp. Disbound. Catechism in form of a dialogue. Not found in Kress Catalogue. Goldsmiths' 31775 lists this for 1840, but as number 1 of Finsbury's Tract Series; this copy is not serialized and could well be an earlier issue.

8 An address to the working men of England, Scotland, and Wales. [Caption title].[London: Cleave, Watson, Hetherington et al., c.1838]. 4 pp. Disbound. Urges complete abstinence from alcohol and tobacco as a necessary part of the Chartist struggle. Signed in print by Hetherington and others. Not found in either Kress or Goldsmiths' catalogues.

9 An open air meeting will be held in London in September next, for the adoption of the "People's Charter" and for agreeing to the following National Petition... Broadside, 28.5 x 19.5 cm. Double column text. H. Hetherington, Printer, 126 Strand. No date (but 1838). An important broadside, and conceivably the first printing, in this format, of the National Petition for universal suffrage. Reference is made to a meeting to be held "in September next." That meeting was in fact actually held on September 17, 1838. Its resolutions and full date appear in another tract.

10 London demonstration in favour of the "People's Charter" and the National Petition... Broadside, 23.5 x 19 cm. Signed in print by William Lovett, Secretary. No date (1838).

A broad invitation to radical groups to attend a mass meeting planned for London to adopt the Charter and Petition. The meeting, scheduled for September 17th, 1838, actually took place, and its resolutions are summarized (and date given in full) in another tract. 11 The Working Men's Association to the Trade Societies of the Metropolis... Broadside, 23.5 x 19 cm. Signed in print by William Lovett, n.d. (1838). London. Urges trade unions to become politically involved in demonstrations on behalf of the adoption of the People's Charter and the National Petition. Comparison is made between the political aloofness of the London societies and the activism of their counterparts in other manufacturing districts. A substantial and important broadside. Reference is made to a meeting scheduled for September 17 [1838] which actually occurred. Its resolutions and full date are given in another tract.

12 An address from the Working Men's Association to the people of England, in reply to the objections of the press. London: Cleave, Watson, Hetherington, [1838]. 8 pp. Disbound. First edition. Defends the recently published People's Charter. Not found in either Kress or Goldsmiths' catalogues. Dated September 11, 1838. Also announces the resolutions of a meeting held September 17, 1838, concerning agitation for universal suffrage expressed in the National Petition.

13 Working Men's Association, Aug. 10, 1839. Sir, You are... requested to attend a special meeting... 1 page printed leaflet, disbound. Concerns the need to provide for the family of William Lovett during his incarceration.

14 "London Working Men's Association. Sir, I am instructed to acquaint you, that a dinner to William Lovett and John Collins, on their release from Warwick Gaol, will take place..." 1 page printed leaflet, ca. August, 1840.

15 Lovett, William and John Collins. Chartism; a new organization of people, embracing a plan for the education and improvement of the people, politically and socially...written in Warwick Gaol.... London: J. Watson, H. Hetherington, and W. Lovett, 1841. Second edition. 132 (2) pp. Including frontis. Disbound. A classic of the movement, written by one of the foremost leaders. The first edition, with different pagination, appeared a year earlier. Goldsmiths' 32437. This edition not in Kress.

16 "London...Sir, You are respectfully invited to attend a meeting..."1 page printed leaflet, dated Nov., 1840, signed in print by Hetherington and others, concerning the bill for Universal Suffrage.

17 "Working Men's Association...Sir, You are respectfully requested to attend.."1 page printed leaflet, no date, signed in print by William Lovett, concerning the bill for Universal Suffrage.

18 [Lovett, William et al]. To the political and social reformers of the United Kingdom. [Caption title]. (London: Lee, c.1840.) 4 pp. Disbound. An important leaflet announcing the formation of the National Association of the United Kingdom and soliciting support. A footnote relates that the rules of the Association will shortly be published in separate form, having already been set forth in Lovett's Chartism, published in 1840. The appeal is signed in print by Lovett and 73 others. Issued either in late 1840 or in very early 1841.

19 [Lovett, William, Henry Hetherington, et al]. To the political and social reformers of the United Kingdom. [Caption title]. 4 pp. (London: Lee, [1841?]). Disbound. An appeal for support against the violent attacks made by Feargus O'Connor and the militant wing of the Chartist movement against the recently proposed plan for a National Association. Signed in print by Hetherington and Lovett. Not found in either Kress or Goldsmiths' catalogues. Probably issued very early in 1841. Mention is made of the publication of Chartism "about five months ago," i.e. August (or slightly later), 1840.

20 [Lovett, William, Henry Hetherington, et al]. Plan, rules, and regulations of the National Association of the United Kingdom for promoting the political and social improvement of the people. London: Watson, Hetherington, Cleave, Lovett, [1841]. 21 (2) pp. Incl. frontis. and plan. Disbound. First separate edition of a key document creating an organization to promote the aims of the People's Charter. It appeared first, in slightly different form, in Lovett's Chartism, which was published in August, or shortly thereafter, 1840. This separate version must have appeared very early in 1841. Goldsmiths' 32444.

21 Detrosier, Rowland. An address on the necessity of an extension of moral and political instruction among the working classes. (With a brief memoir of the author) [by John Kay].London: Cleave, [183-]. 24 pp. Disbound. Detrosier's works on education continued to be published in successive editions after his death in 1834 by the early Chartist organizers, whose program emphasized education reform. Kress C2781 lists this under 1831, which appears to be incorrect from internal evidence. Goldsmiths' 27539 lists it under 1832. The publisher, Cleave, was one of the foremost early Chartists.

22 The philosopher. Saturday. Sept. 19, 1835...address. 8 pp. Disbound.A wide ranging radical periodical. This issue proclaims the labor theory of value and the justness of complete social equality.

23 New Newspicker. The Penny Monthly, by George Edmonds. George Edmonds' Penny Bi-monthly, for November and December, with pages of new matter for this second month. (London, 1837.) each 16 pp. Disbound. Two consecutive issues, designated No.1-Nov. 1, 1837 and No.1-Dec. 1, 1837, respectively. The second issue repeats much of the content of the first, but adds several pages of interesting remarks about the editor's acquaintance with Hetherington, Cleave and Lovett, three leaders of the Chartist movement. The content is generally that of flamboyant, wide-ranging radicalism.

24 The pull all together. To the sober and industrious of the working classes. [Caption title]. (London: Thorns, 1838.) 8 pp. Disbound. One of a series of tracts, designated Social Tracts No. 3. Issued by a religious cooperative group called the National Community Friendly Society, which appears to be associated with Owenism. It published one of Owen's works in its tract series, and it refers here to its weekly paper, the New Moral World. Goldsmiths' 30751.

25 Declaration of rights of the people of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. according to the ancient laws and customs of the realm of England...Broadside, text in three columns. 30 x 24 cm. J. Cunningham, printer. No date. An elaborate radical manifesto. Among the signatories are the leading Chartists Feargus O'Connor and Henry Hetherington.

Bibliography of books cited:
1. Canney. M. and D. Knott. Catalogue of the Goldsmith's Library of Economic Literature. 4v. 1971-
2. Harvard University. Graduate School of Business Administration. The Kress Library of Business and Economics. 1940 + supps.

Collection Description


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